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Piezoelectric effect

 
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Ted
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Joined: 30 Jun 2008
Posts: 46
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sat Jul 16, 2016 1:32 pm    Post subject: Piezoelectric effect Reply with quote

I hear a lot of people mentioning the piezoelectric effect of crystals when subjected to the contraction of cured resin. It has always been my understanding that production of electrical energy occurs during the time, or duration, of deformation, but ceases once the crystal is in a static state (even though deformed).
I don't understand how a crystal can continue to produce electrical energy once the resin has cured and no more deformation is occurring. Am I missing something here?
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Sensei
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 16, 2016 5:09 pm    Post subject: Re: Piezoelectric effect Reply with quote

Ted wrote:
I hear a lot of people mentioning the piezoelectric effect of crystals when subjected to the contraction of cured resin. It has always been my understanding that production of electrical energy occurs during the time, or duration, of deformation, but ceases once the crystal is in a static state (even though deformed).
I don't understand how a crystal can continue to produce electrical energy once the resin has cured and no more deformation is occurring. Am I missing something here?
.

You are correct. We thought that at first, about 13 years ago.

I was wrong.

The piezoelectric effect sounds cool so many makers like to use it in orgonite descriptions and explanations. A buzz word.

The piezoelectric charge is induced by rapid mechanical/physical distortion like a crack lighter (flameless). I worked in electro mechanical power transmission engineering for years, making electricity do what was needed, Silicone control rectifiers were my speciality . Been making orgonite for well over 13 years.I too thought that that what was happening, at first.

I have only theories as how the crystals work

I am leaning toward the idea that some factor in the molecular structure is responsible. SiO2 is the second most common mineral on the planet and can store information, produce electricity, make glass, carvings, jewelry, your computer and so much more. Amethyst and citrine are quartz, colored by trace minerals.

If you figure it out, kindly share with us.

Sensei
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Ted
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Joined: 30 Jun 2008
Posts: 46
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sun Jul 17, 2016 3:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think what crystals do is to polarize otherwise amorphous energy. Richenbach did some experimenting with crystals in a dark room and found that they emitted blue light at the tip and reddish light at the base. This is coherence and polarization in my book.
You can do the same thing with a flat, or helical copper coil. The various subtle properties of each kind of crystal is beyond me though.
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Cronin
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 17, 2016 5:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Piezoelectricity (literally, "pressing electricity") is much simpler than it sounds: it just means using crystals to convert mechanical energy into electricity or vice-versa.

What is piezoelectricity?

Squeeze certain crystals (such as quartz) and you can make electricity flow through them. The reverse is usually true as well: if you pass electricity through the same crystals, they "squeeze themselves" by vibrating back and forth.
Piezoelectricity (also called the piezoelectric effect) is the appearance of an electrical potential (a voltage, in other words) across the sides of a crystal when you subject it to mechanical stress (by squeezing it).

In practice, the crystal becomes a kind of tiny battery with a positive charge on one face and a negative charge on the opposite face; current flows if we connect the two faces together to make a circuit. In the reverse piezoelectric effect, a crystal becomes mechanically stressed (deformed in shape) when a voltage is applied across its opposite faces.

What causes piezoelectricity?

Think of a crystal and you probably picture balls (atoms) mounted on bars (the bonds that hold them together), a bit like a climbing frame. Now, by crystals, scientists don't necessarily mean intriguing bits of rock you find in gift shops: a crystal is the scientific name for any solid whose atoms or molecules are arranged in a very orderly way based on endless repetitions of the same basic atomic building block (called the unit cell). So a lump of iron is just as much of a crystal as a piece of quartz. In a crystal, what we have is actually less like a climbing frame (which doesn't necessarily have an orderly, repeating structure) and more like three-dimensional, patterned wallpaper.
In most crystals (such as metals), the unit cell (the basic repeating unit) is symmetrical; in piezoelectric crystals, it isn't. Normally, piezoelectric crystals are electrically neutral: the atoms inside them may not be symmetrically arranged, but their electrical charges are perfectly balanced: a positive charge in one place cancels out a negative charge nearby. However, if you squeeze or stretch a piezoelectric crystal, you deform the structure, pushing some of the atoms closer together or further apart, upsetting the balance of positive and negative, and causing net electrical charges to appear. This effect carries through the whole structure so net positive and negative charges appear on opposite, outer faces of the crystal.

The reverse-piezoelectric effect occurs in the opposite way. Put a voltage across a piezoelectric crystal and you're subjecting the atoms inside it to "electrical pressure." They have to move to rebalance themselves—and that's what causes piezoelectric crystals to deform (slightly change shape) when you put a voltage across them.

What is piezoelectricity used for?

There are all kinds of situations where we need to convert mechanical energy (pressure or movement of some kind) into electrical signals or vice-versa. Often we can do that with a piezoelectric transducer. A transducer is simply a device that converts small amounts of energy from one kind into another (for example, converting light, sound, or mechanical pressure into electrical signals).

In ultrasound equipment, a piezoelectric transducer converts electrical energy into extremely rapid mechanical vibrations—so fast, in fact, that it makes sounds, but ones too high-pitched for our ears to hear. These ultrasound vibrations can be used for scanning, cleaning, and all kinds of other things.

In a microphone, we need to convert sound energy (waves of pressure traveling through the air) into electrical energy—and that's something piezoelectric crystals can help us with. Simply stick the vibrating part of the microphone to a crystal and, as pressure waves from your voice arrive, they'll make the crystal move back and forth, generating corresponding electrical signals. The "needle" in a gramophone (sometimes called a record player) works in the opposite way. As the diamond-tipped needle rides along the spiral groove in your LP, it bumps up and down. These vibrations push and pull on a lightweight piezoelectric crystal, producing electrical signals that your stereo then converts back into audible sounds.

In a quartz clock or watch, the reverse-piezoelectric effect is used to keep time very precisely. Electrical energy from a battery is fed into a crystal to make it oscillate thousands of times a second. The watch then uses an electronic circuit to turn that into slower, once-per-second beats that a tiny motor and some precision gears use to drive the second, minute, and hour hands around the clock-face.

Piezoelectricity is also used, much more crudely, in spark lighters for gas stoves and barbecues. Press a lighter switch and you'll hear a clicking sound and see sparks appear. What you're doing, when you press the switch, is squeezing a piezoelectric crystal, generating a voltage, and making a spark fly across a small gap.

IMO in orgonite,piezoelectricity produces vibrations(from electrical charge)and also converting positive ions to negative ions.Being near orgonite is like you getting a nap near waterfalls!
Metals gather EMF and crystal converting them to harmless radiations also.

Peace

Cronin
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“If you want to find the secrets of the universe, think in terms of energy, frequency and vibration.” -Nikola Tesla...
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